Thank you for loving a spoonie!

Chronically Rising – Thank you for loving a spoonie!

So often we get stuck in a tailspin where we only see the budding bullies, nosy neighbours and ignorant idiots around us, that we forget to say thank you to the loved ones and friends that remain by our sides despite our chronic illness. So today we would like to say thank you! Thank you for loving a spoonie!

When becoming chronically ill we often become more, and more dependent on others for daily tasks “normies” take for granted. If we sometimes seem grouchy, cranky and irritated please understand that you did not do anything wrong – we are most likely just having a worse day than normal. We still truly appreciate everything you do for us from the bottom of our hearts!

We can never say thank you enough, but we can lists a few of the things we appreciate most:

Believing us:

This may sound like a given to any loving and supportive friend or family member, but online support groups are filled with horror stories of family and friends that believe chronic illness warriors are lazy and crazy. Thank you for not questioning our sanity, symptoms or the severity of our illness. This is the greatest gift you can give anyone with chronic illness!

Helping with household chores:

Most of us that are stricken down with chronic illness were always overachieving busybodies that ran a smooth household, but now we struggle to do simplistic tasks like cooking or cleaning. Thank you for not complaining when the house is a mess and rather just jumping in and doing the dishes, sweeping and taking out the trash. Thank you for every nutritious home-cooked meal you make with love according to our dietary restrictions. And thank you for doing more than your share and our part without hesitation!

Just being our friend:

Chronic illness is a filter that removes most friends and family from our lives. Most people can not grasp our lacking abilities to do fun things with them, and slowly get caught in the filter of judgement, disbelief and indifference. We often live in isolation with minimal in-person contact, as it is too taxing on our health to go out and socialize. Thank you for the few individuals that stick around even when we can never plan far ahead, wear pajamas on most days and can hardly ever go out somewhere.

Never judging:

Sometimes in a flare, fatigue kicks inn, we skip bathing for days, have a pile of dishes and look like a zombie that just rose from the dead. Thank you for not judging us on these days, but rather helping us through cooking, taking us to medical appointments and making sure we take our daily dose of medication.

Laughing with us:

Let’s be honest chronic illness often causes that we have the coordination of a drunken freshman, the vocabulary of a learning toddler and the memory of a dementia patient. Thank you for laughing with us at our lack of coordination (even when we break most of the crockery…), messy word mix-ups (like when I told my other half to close the fridge, when I meant to put off the light – we both laughed as I pointed out if you close the fridge the light goes off, so I was not that far off…) and crazy clumsiness (the stationary furniture jumps in front of us – it’s not our fault…). Thank you for not fighting with us about these things, as they are really out of our control.

So once again THANK YOU! Without you this battle would have been unbearable.


You can visit Chronically Rising’s blog or follow us on Facebook or Instagram.

This post is proudly brought to you by Chantelle Spies from Chronically Rising. To learn more about the author please visit our about section.

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